Traditional recipes

Sauteed Baby Artichokes

Sauteed Baby Artichokes

Baby artichokes, sautéed with onions and garlic, served with grated Parmesan cheese. So good!

Photography Credit:Sally Vargas

For years I’ve walked by those packages of baby artichokes at Trader Joe’s not willing to try them because they just didn’t seem worth the effort.

I’m glad to report that I was completely wrong!

They actually take less time to prepare than regular artichokes because they cook up in only a few minutes versus 40 minutes for globe artichokes.

Even though they are called “baby artichokes,” they aren’t actually immature artichokes, but simply a different variety that reaches maturity at a much smaller size than regular artichokes.

Unlike larger artichokes, more parts of these small ones are edible. You don’t have to scoop out the choke, you can eat it with the rest of the heart and tender leaves.You can also simmer the discarded leaves in water for an hour to make an artichoke vegetable stock for soup, so nothing goes to waste.

Artichokes pair well with something acidic, such as lemon or balsamic vinegar, and something creamy, such as mayonnaise or Parmesan cheese.

These sautéed baby artichokes are easy to prepare and combine flavors that work naturally well with artichokes. They can be eaten alone, or mixed in with pasta or risotto, or baked on to pizza.

Sauteed Baby Artichokes Recipe

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds baby artichokes
  • 4 cups of water, divided 3 cups and 1 cup
  • 4 Tbsp lemon juice (from 1 to 2 lemons) divided
  • 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 medium yellow onion, chopped
  • 2 green onions (scallions), thinly sliced, including the green ends
  • 3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 pinch of Herbes de Provence
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 pinch black pepper
  • 1/4 to 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan, or to taste
  • 2 Tbsp chopped fresh parsley (for garnish)

Method

1 Prep the artichokes: Rinse the baby artichokes. Fill a bowl with 3 cups of water and add 3 tablespoons of the lemon juice to it.

Cut off the stem of each artichoke to 1/4-inch from the base. Peel back and remove the petals until only the top third of the cone tip is pale green. Cut off the pale green tips.

Trim off any remaining green from base of artichoke. Halve or quarter the artichokes, depending on their size and drop them into the bowl of acidified water (to prevent discoloration).

2 Steam the artichokes: Drain artichokes in a colander. In a large skillet, bring one cup of the water to a boil. Add the artichokes, cover and simmer for 3 to 5 minutes, depending on the size of the artichokes. Drain well.

3 Sauté the artichokes: Wipe out the skillet to remove excess water. Heat to medium high and add the olive oil. Add the artichokes, onions, garlic, and herbes de Provence. Cook, stirring occasionally, for five minutes.

Stir in the remaining 1 tablespoon of lemon juice, the salt and pepper.

4 Serve: Transfer to a serving bowl and sprinkle with freshly grated Parmesan and parsley on top.

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How to Cook Baby Artichokes

Baby artichokes are delicious roasted, grilled, sautéed, or steamed. Baby artichokes are small and tender enough that you can eat the choke part, unlike with a larger artichoke. When you roast them, they get almost sweet, and the edges get just a little crispy. Read on for step-by-step instructions for how to trim and prepare baby artichokes and a recipe for roast baby artichokes with spring vegetables.


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Veal Cutlets with Sauteed Baby Artichokes

Fill large bowl with cold water add lemon juice. Cut off stem and top quarter from 1 artichoke. Bend back dark green outer leaves and snap off at base until pale green and yellow leaves remain. Quarter artichoke lengthwise remove any purple-tipped leaves from center. Place in lemon water. Repeat with remaining artichokes.

Step 2

Cook drained artichokes in large pot of boiling salted water until crisp-tender, about 8 minutes. Drain well set aside.

Step 3

Heat oil in heavy large skillet over medium-high heat. Add garlic and sauté until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add artichokes and sauté 5 minutes. Add tomatoes and crushed red pepper. Cook until tomatoes soften, about 5 minutes. Stir in basil and lemon peel. Season to taste with salt and pepper. DO AHEAD: Can be made 2 hours ahead. Cover and let stand at room temperature. Rewarm before using.

Step 4

Sprinkle veal with salt and pepper. Melt butter in large nonstick skillet over high heat. Working in batches, add veal and cook until brown, about 2 minutes per side. Transfer veal to plates. Sprinkle with parsley. Serve with artichoke mixture.


5 Dishes That’ll Make You Fall in Love with Baby Artichokes

Fresh artichoke season, which is at its peak from March through May, has arrived, and we can’t get enough of the sweet green thistle . And as much as we love generously-sized globe artichokes , there’s a special place in our hearts for their smaller cousin, baby artichokes.

Baby artichokes are young artichokes that haven’t fully developed chokes, the mass of immature florets in the center of the plant that are too prickly to be edible. Not having to wrestle with the choke means that baby artichokes easier to prepare, since you can consume the entire vegetable. Since they’re immature, they’re also tender and sweet—the perfect metaphor for spring. Check out our video to learn how to trim baby artichokes.

Once you’ve properly trimmed them, try your hand at one of these five recipes that take advantage of fresh, peak-season baby artichokes.

A gently steamed artichoke leaf dipped in melted butter is exquisite, but grilled baby artichokes only improve on a good thing.


Sautéed Baby Artichokes with Garlic and Lemon

On Saturday I attended thefood blog forum in LA to pick up new ideas about blog writing and meet more people within the food-blogging community. The sessions were incredibly helpful and it was a blast meeting up with new friends. There were 6 sessions throughout the day and my personal favorite wasDiane and Todd’s session about food photography. They are such a warm-hearted couple who gave a wealth of information and tips. A large portion of their session focused on lighting, which I’ve come to learn is the most important element of photography. We also had the opportuntiy to hear Jadendiscuss authenticity and diversity when creating/writing a blog. Then the very talented duo, Adam and Matt, hosted a session about food styling and food photography. Adam said that every time he plates food (even if it’s for his own dinner at home) he gets excited. I love that!

It was so great to catch up with new friends and meet several other LA area bloggers. Being in a room with such creative thinkers was incredibly energizing. It reminded me of the my early days at music school – you could literally feel the excitement and creativity twirling in the air.


How to Prep Baby Artichokes

The baby artichokes are a little larger than the size of a golf ball (try not to buy any larger than that) and they&rsquore very easy to prepare. The first step is to cut off the top portion of the artichoke.

Now peel and snap off the first two layers of leaves until you reach pale, smooth leaves.

The entire tender center is edible. Slice them just like this:

Let the slices soak in lemony water so that they don&rsquot discolor.

When I&rsquom ready to cook, I like to put all of the artichokes into a salad spinner to dry them completely.

Heat a large saute pan (or wok!) with olive oil and saute the artichokes for a few minutes.

Then add the garlic slices (if you had added garlic first, they would have burned)


Sautéed Baby Artichokes with Garlic and Lemon

On Saturday I attended the food blog forum in LA to pick up new ideas about blog writing and meet more people within the food-blogging community. The sessions were incredibly helpful and it was a blast meeting up with new friends. There were 6 sessions throughout the day and my personal favorite was Diane and Todd’s session about food photography. They are such a warm-hearted couple who gave a wealth of information and tips. A large portion of their session focused on lighting, which I’ve come to learn is the most important element of photography. We also had the opportuntiy to hear Jaden discuss authenticity and diversity when creating/writing a blog. Then the very talented duo, Adam and Matt , hosted a session about food styling and food photography. Adam said that every time he plates food (even if it’s for his own dinner at home) he gets excited. I love that!

It was so great to catch up with new friends and meet several other LA area bloggers. Being in a room with such creative thinkers was incredibly energizing. It reminded me of the my early days at music school – you could literally feel the excitement and creativity twirling in the air.


Sauteed Baby Artichokes - Recipes

I had always thought of artichokes as an unwieldy vegetable, one that involved too much work to eat. After becoming a fan of the hassle-free jarred artichokes many years ago, I finally built up the courage to try cooking fresh artichokes for the first time. Then I realized that I had been missing out on a very unique and ancient vegetable, actually a flower bud. Artichokes originate from the Mediterranean countries and have been revered since Roman times. There are many varieties, but here in the United States only two varieties are readily available, the large globe, and the small baby, which are not actually babies but a fully grown small variety. I decided to set my knife upon them since their size would be perfect for tackling the first time around.

There is a certain way to clean and prepare baby artichokes. It seems daunting at first, but after a few of these little buds are peeled, it's easy to develop a rhythm. With a sharp paring knife, pretty much anything can be done. It's all about peeling, peeling, and more peeling to get down to the tender light green part of the artichoke. If you think you've peeled enough, peel some more. But be careful because artichokes are prickly, I know from experience. there's no need to remove the choke since these artichokes are much more tender than larger varieties. After some trimming to remove the tough skin from the base, it's time for a quick bath in acidulated water (lemon water) to keep the discoloration at bay. Once drained, the artichokes are ready for cooking any which way.

Following this simple Mediterranean-style recipe, these prickly vegetables turn out wonderfully. After the more rigorous techniques above, it's on to a very simple way of cooking. Simmering the artichokes for a period in chicken stock infuses them with flavor, and a finishing dash of vinegar adds a touch of tartness. But the pièce de résistance is a dusting of freshly grated Parmesan cheese, adding another level of flavor. This makes a great side dish or an ingredient that can be used in a main dish like pasta or as a topping on pizza. The possibilities are limitless.

2 pounds baby artichokes
1 cup chicken stock
olive oil
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tablespoon red-wine vinegar
coarse sea salt
freshly ground black pepper
1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Prepare a bowl of acidulated water: a large bowl of water with the juice of two lemons. Wash the artichokes. Working with one at a time, trim each artichoke by cutting off the stem within a 1/4 inch from the base, peeling the base while removing the dark leaves until pale green leaves are visible, and lastly by cutting off the pointy tips of the remaining leaves. Quarter the artichokes and add to the bowl of acidulated water. Drain before using.

Warm olive oil in a large skillet set over medium heat. Add garlic and sauté until fragrant, about 2 minutes. Add artichokes and stock. Season with salt and pepper. Cover and simmer over medium heat for about 10 to 20 minutes, until artichokes are tender. Remove the cover and continue to cook until any remaining liquid has evaporated. Add vinegar. Check seasoning. Serve with grated Parmesan. Yield: 4 to 6 servings.


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Recipe: Parmesan Garlic Roasted Baby Artichokes

Summary: Fiesole Baby Purple Artichokes — almost entirely edible, with no hairy choke — charm after a bath of garlicky olive oil and a blanket of Parmesan cheese. A quick broil, and the pleasures of the artichoke are all yours.

Ingredients

  • 1 pound Fiesole Baby Purple Artichokes
  • 3-4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2-3 cloves crushed garlic
  • Grated Parmesan cheese

Instructions

  1. With a sharp knife, trim stems and tops off artichokes (about half an inch off the top), and peel away tough outer leaves, leaving just the soft inner leaves.
  2. Bring a shallow pot of water to a boil, insert a steamer tray, add trimmed artichokes, cover and steam for about 8 minutes. Remove from heat remove chokes from pot onto a cutting board. Fire up the broiler.
  3. Slice each steamed choke in half vertically. Into a large mixing bowl place olive oil and garlic and whisk to combine. Add halved chokes and toss to coat them with garlicky oil. Using a tongs, place each half choke, cut side up, on a baking tray. Sprinkle each choke half with some grated Parmesan.
  4. Place tray under broiler and broil until bubbly and cheese is just starting to tinge light brown this might take 3-5 minutes.
  5. Remove and serve!
  6. Serves 4.

Preparation time: 20 minutes
Cooking time: 10 minutes
Diet type: Vegetarian Gluten free
Number of servings (yield): 4
Culinary tradition: USA (Nouveau)

Beginning now and continuing through May 6, there’s an Artichoke Festival in Southern California with Ralphs markets and Maria’s Italian Kitchen. You can buy these Baby Purple Artichokes and two other special varieties – all grown at Baroda Farms in Lompoc, Calif. — exclusively at Ralphs, and/or go to Maria’s Italian Kitchen, where they will be featured on the restaurant menu. (Maria’s has made a name for itself with stuffed artichokes. Try their recipe at home if you like!)

Artichoke samples were provided to me by Frieda’s Produce.


Watch the video: Artyčoky - Roman Paulus - Kulinářská Akademie Lidlu (January 2022).