Traditional recipes

Linguine with Leeks, Radicchio, and Walnut Pesto

Linguine with Leeks, Radicchio, and Walnut Pesto

Ingredients

  • 4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
  • 4 cups thinly sliced leeks (including some dark green parts)
  • 1/2 cup (packed) fresh Italian parsley leaves
  • 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese plus shaved Parmesan for garnish
  • 1/4 cup walnut pieces (about 1 ounce) plus additional for garnish
  • 2 teaspoons fresh lemon juice
  • 2 cups thinly sliced radicchio

Recipe Preparation

  • Cook pasta in large pot of boiling salted water until tender but still firm to bite, stirring occasionally.

  • Heat 1 tablespoon oil in large nonstick skillet over medium high heat. Add leeks; season with salt and pepper. Cover; cook until tender and beginning to brown, stirring occasionally, about 10 minutes.

  • Puree parsley, 1/4 cup Parmesan, 1/4 cup walnuts, lemon juice, and 3 tablespoons oil in mini processor until coarse puree forms. Season pesto with salt and pepper.

  • Drain pasta, reserving 1 cup cooking liquid. Add pasta, pesto, and radicchio to leeks; toss, adding cooking liquid by tablespoonfuls if dry. Garnish with walnuts and shaved Parmesan.

Recipe by The Bon Appétit Test Kitchen,Reviews Section

Mascarpone recipes

This sumptuously thick and soft Italian cheese works in sweet and savoury recipes alike.

Very berry trifle

Layers of mascarpone, custard, cherry conserve, mixed berries, Madeira cake and sherry - who doesn't love a trifle?

Smoked salmon & mascarpone tortilla

A simple-to-follow recipe for a deluxe omelette that's the perfect size to share

Orange & almond cake with citrus mascarpone

An unbelievably moist and yummy dessert

Roasted tomato & mascarpone soup

Luxuriously smooth, this blended cream of tomato soup is packed full of rich Italian flavours

Pasta with prawns, mascarpone & lemon

This healthy seafood dish is a light mid-week Italian supper best made with wholemeal pasta shapes

Cherry, almond & lemon mascarpone tart

Round off an idyllic afternoon with friends by presenting this stunning, make-ahead dessert

Tomato & mascarpone pasta bake

Everyone loves a pasta bake and this one is sure to be a family favourite

Gnocchi with courgette, mascarpone & spring onions

Try this new way of serving an Italian classic to make a change from pasta

Strawberry parfait with Vin Santo, mascarpone & biscotti

A deliciously creamy, Italian strawberry dessert

Chicken stuffed with herby mascarpone

This super-quick and special recipe for two is bound to become a My Good Food favourite

Mascarpone & marmalade ice cream

This grown-up ice cream is total heaven with anything chocolaty

Spiced baked figs with ginger mascarpone

This dish makes the perfect ending to a relaxed dinner party, special yet stress-free

Roasted vegetable couscous with mascarpone

This hearty supper is healthy, cheap and filling - great for an easy meal for your mates

Deep-filled asparagus & mascarpone tartlets

A fresh starter or canapé. A little skill is require, but once mastered you can easily change the fillings to suit the seasons

Roasted rhubarb with mascarpone

Drop-dead gorgeous on the plate

Chicken, squash & pesto lasagne

This alternative pasta bake is great for making in batches- assemble the layers of mascapone, chicken, basil and butternut then freeze or bake

Crunchy pesto & mozzarella baked mushrooms

Italian green basil sauce makes a good base for this stuffed, vegetarian dish with creamy mascarpone and light rocket salad


5 of 35

Cheesy Skillet Gnocchi

Time: 25 minutes
Shopping Tip: Look for vine-ripened tomatoes in cooler months. They tend to be sweeter and juicier.

Serve with Grape and Hazelnut Salad: Combine 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil, 1 tablespoon white balsamic vinegar, and ½ teaspoon Dijon mustard in a large bowl, stirring with a whisk. Add 1 (5-ounce) package mixed salad greens, ? cup halved seedless red grapes, and 2 tablespoons coarsely chopped toasted hazelnuts toss to coat. SERVES 4 (serving size: about 1 cup) CALORIES 71 FAT 5.6g (sat 0.6g) SODIUM 29mg


Williams-Sonoma Collection: Pasta

From spiral pasta tossed with fresh pesto to a delicious lasagne layered with duck and cream sauce, the variety of pasta dishes is an endless source of inspiration in the kitchen and a pleasure at the table.

Williams-Sonoma Collection Pasta offers more than 40 easy-to-follow recipes, including both classic favorites and fresh new ideas. In these pages, you'll find inspiring pasta dishes designed to suit any occasion—from a light summer supper to a festive dinner party. This expertly photographed, full-color recipe collection, appealing to both novice and experienced cooks, will become an essential addition to your kitchen bookshelf.

"I hope you'll use a recipe from this book to make pasta for dinner tonight!"

Отзывы - Написать отзыв

LibraryThing Review

This is an very updated version of their previously published book by the same name. So what's different? Everything! All new recipes by a new chef/author, same format lovely photographs, easy to . Читать весь отзыв

Great Recipes

The illustration in the book are beautiful! Great recipes! Easy to read and follow! Recommend this book! Читать весь отзыв


Ingredients

  • 1 pound linguine
  • 1 recipe for basil pesto, from above
  • 1/4 cup Parmesan cheese, shredded
  • Fresh cracked black pepper

Bring 3 quarts of water to a boil. Add salt and linguine into the boiling water. When the pasta is almost cooked to your liking, scoop out 3/4 cups of the pasta cooking liquid and add it to a pasta serving bowl. Drain the pasta in a colander, shaking it to remove excess water. Transfer the pasta to the bowl containing the pasta cooking liquid and toss. The cooking liquid will be absorbed by the pasta. Add the prepared pesto, mix well, and taste for seasonings. It should be well seasoned and the pasta should be quite moist. Serve immediately in hot deep plates, sprinkled with the shredded Parmesan cheese and freshly grated black pepper.


Protect your heart with sound dietary decisions

Cardiovascular disease, including heart attack and stroke, is the number one cause of death in the United States and a leading killer worldwide. Scary statistics aside, there are a number of steps we can all take to help protect our hearts, including making sound dietary choices. For advice on heart-healthy eating and living, we consulted Michael F. Roizen, M.D., the co-author with Mehmet C. Oz, M.D., of the best-selling "YOU" series, including "YOU: The Owner's Manual" and "YOU: On a Diet." Roizen is also the co-author of "The RealAge Diet" and contributes to realage.com.

One way to increase your heart's health is through diet, choosing foods that are low in cholesterol and saturated fat — for information on how to do this, check out our favorite heart-healthy recipes and see below for Roizen's advice.

Heart healthy–eating tips

  • Five foods to avoid: Roizen isn't shy about telling people to cut things out of their diet. Here are the five foods he says should be avoided at all costs as they cause aging and "have no redeeming value" for health:
  • Saturated fat (including palm and coconut oil)
  • Trans fat (look for the words "partially hydrogenated vegetable oil" on labels)
  • Added sugar (i.e., sugar that does not naturally occur in the food)
  • Syrups (corn, maple, and other syrups are just added sugar)
  • Any grain that is not a 100-percent whole grain.

Epicurious' take: You may not be able to cut these items out of your diet completely, but it's a good idea to limit them.

  • Eat fish: Certain types of fish are excellent sources of omega-3 essential fatty acids, which have been found to lower "bad" cholesterol and have a host of other health benefits. Roizen says that if you're buying fish in the United States, salmon and trout are your best bets for omega-3s.

That's because farm-raised fish are fed corn and soybeans, and tend to have low levels of omega-3 fats and higher levels of less-desirable omega-6 fats. The good news if you're watching your budget: "You don't have to get fresh salmon to get great benefit from salmon," says Roizen. He's a fan of canned salmon and frozen salmon burgers, both of which tend to come from the overrun of wild Alaskan salmon catches.

    Raise a glass of flavonoids: Red wine is an excellent source of flavonoids — antioxidants that can help protect the heart. "When the body lacks adequate levels of antioxidants, free radical damage ensues, leading to increases in LDL-cholesterol oxidation and plaque formation on arterial walls," an article from the Cleveland Clinic explains. Other good sources of flavonoids are chocolate, tomatoes, broccoli, and "virtually every colored vegetable," says Roizen. So load up on fresh produce for a daily dose of flavonoids.


Linguine with Leeks, Radicchio, and Walnut Pesto - Recipes

Discover the real traditional
Spaghetti Carbonara recipe
as many other inspirations

Discover the benefits and goodness of the Mediterranean Diet

Discover the recipes and gourmet tips from reputed Chefs to plate the finest pasta courses.

Clean the pumpkin, remove its seeds and cut it into cubes large by about 0.40 inches. Put the pumpkin…

“Life is a journey paced by the choices we make”. This starts our conversation with Pietro Leemann, a chef with…

Paris, October 10 and 11, 2019, two days of breathtaking and thrilling contests that saw 14 young chefs…


Demetra

Take 100-150g of Mexican beans and put them into a tall bowl, add a spoonful of extra virgin olive oil, the egg yolk and blend to a smooth cream with a stick blender.

Take the monkfish fillet, clean, bone thoroughly, glaze with the creamed beans and put into the oven, preheated to 150°C, for 20 minutes.

Cut the Fontina into cubes, add the remaining beans, salt to taste and add a little chopped mint.

Pour the creamed beans into parchment-lined round moulds, not too tall, and bake at 180°C for ten minutes.

Slice the potatoes and leeks into rounds and boil in salted water until cooked.

Whizz to a velvety consistency with a stick blender.

To serve, pour some leek cream in the centre of the plate and add the bean flan.

Finely slice the fish and arrange around the flan in a petal pattern.

Finish the plate with a teaspoonful of salmon roe on the flan, a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil, some fresh mint leaves and a good twist of white pepper.

Preparation Instructions

Take 100-150g of Mexican beans and put them into a tall bowl, add a spoonful of extra virgin olive oil, the egg yolk and blend to a smooth cream with a stick blender.

Take the monkfish fillet, clean, bone thoroughly, glaze with the creamed beans and put into the oven, preheated to 150°C, for 20 minutes.

Cut the Fontina into cubes, add the remaining beans, salt to taste and add a little chopped mint.

Pour the creamed beans into parchment-lined round moulds, not too tall, and bake at 180°C for ten minutes.

Slice the potatoes and leeks into rounds and boil in salted water until cooked.

Whizz to a velvety consistency with a stick blender.

To serve, pour some leek cream in the centre of the plate and add the bean flan.

Finely slice the fish and arrange around the flan in a petal pattern.

Finish the plate with a teaspoonful of salmon roe on the flan, a drizzle of extra virgin olive oil, some fresh mint leaves and a good twist of white pepper.


Gluten-free recipes

With its plentiful pizza, pastas and breads, 'Italian cuisine' and 'gluten-free' don't seem like natural bedfellows. However, as this collection of gluten-free Italian recipes demonstrates, there are plenty of ways of adapting your favourite dishes to a gluten-free diet. Even pasta, the gluten-dodger's nemesis, can be given the wheat-free treatment with Cristina Bowerman's homemade gluten-free pasta recipe, using rice flour and buckwheat flour to make beautiful tagliatelle. Risotto is another Italian comfort food staple that is naturally gluten-free - try the Costardi Brothers' asparagus risotto recipe for a next-level version.

There are some fantastic gluten-free dessert recipes, too. The Costardi Brothers' meringue recipe , served with chocolate sauce and ice cream, is made simply with egg whites, sugar and lemon zest, while Fabrizio Marino's Vegan tiramisu recipe swaps sponge fingers for spiced biscuits made with almond meal.


California Turkey Chili

1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
4 large cloves garlic, smashed, peeled and chopped
2 large poblano chiles, stemmed, seeded and diced
1 celery stalk, chopped
1 large onion, chopped
1 1/2 pounds ground turkey (dark meat)
1 tablespoon all-purpose flour
4 tablespoons tomato paste
3 tablespoons chili powder
1 tablespoon ground cumin
2 teaspoons (packed) dark brown sugar
1 teaspoon dried Mexican oregano, crushed
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
3 cups low-salt chicken broth (preferably organic)
One 15 to 16-ounce can cannellini (white kidney beans), rinsed and drained

Simplest Quinoa and Pine Nut Pilaf, recipe follows
Assorted garnishes, such as chopped onion, shredded white Cheddar, chopped tomatoes and/or sour cream
Directions
Heat the oil in a heavy, large pot over medium-high heat. Add the garlic, poblanos, celery and onions. Saute until the vegetables soften, 5 to 6 minutes. Add the turkey and saute until no longer pink, breaking up the turkey with the back of a spoon, about 7 minutes. Sprinkle the flour over and stir to blend. Add the tomato paste, chili powder, cumin, sugar, oregano, 1 teaspoon salt, 1/2 teaspoon pepper, cinnamon and cloves. Cook 1 to 2 minutes, stirring to blend. Add the broth and beans. Bring to a simmer. Reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer until the flavors blend and the chili thickens to desired consistency, stirring often, 20 to 30 minutes. Season with more salt and pepper.

To serve, spoon Simplest Quinoa and Pine Nut Pilaf into deep bowls. Ladle chili over. Serve with garnishes.

Cook's Note: Other garnishes that you could offer: chopped radishes, pickled jalapenos, crumbled cotija cheese, tortilla chips and/or pico de gallo

Simplest Quinoa and Pine Nut Pilaf:
1 1/4 cups whole grain quinoa (about 7 ounces)
1 3/4 cups low-salt chicken broth (preferably organic)
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
1/3 cup chopped fresh cilantro or Italian parsley
1/3 cup pine nuts
Place the quinoa in a fine sieve. Rinse under cold running water 1 full minute. Set aside to drain.

Bring the broth, salt and pepper to a boil in heavy, medium saucepan over medium-high heat. Stir in the quinoa. Cover, reduce the heat to medium-low and simmer until the quinoa is tender and all the broth is absorbed, about 15 minutes. Turn off the heat. Let the quinoa stand, still covered, for 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Scatter pine nuts on a small rimmed baking sheet. Toast the nuts until golden, stirring occasionally, about 5 minutes. Cool on the baking sheet.


Watch the video: How to Say Fusilli? CORRECTLY Italian Pasta Type Spiral Shape (January 2022).